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the leadership deficit, chris christie, marco rubio, we have a cast of characters for the 2016 race that's different than the cast of characters in the 2012 race, so i think there's a little silver lining in that for republicans. >> let's listen to what jay carney had to say about the new republican report. >> the best way to increase support with the public for your party is to embrace policies to public supports. >> howard fineman, jay carney makes sense every once in a while. >> and he did right there. and this report from rnc read like a soviet five-year plan. we will have more production and we are going to reach out to the ethnic minorities that we don't understand. it had very little relationship to reality, except there was a distant sound of their realization that for example on gay rights, they're way, way wrong. hillary clinton today came out in favor of supporting gay marriage. young people in the rnc's own report, young people are the ones leading the way on that. i'll give reince priebus credit for saying in that report that the issue of gay rights is a gateway issue for yo
can you tell us when conservatives get more honest about the debt and deficit. a conservative columnist says about the new ryan budget, it sacrificed seriousness for seriousness by promising to reach budgetary balance, not over the long term as budgets 1.0 and 2.0 did, but in a ten year window. this is not going to happen, and more importantly there's no reason why it needs to happen. modest deficits are perfectly compatible with fiscal responsibility. talk about singing a new tune. and the conservative think tank, the american enterprise institute asks why does the budget need to balance in ten years? debt reduction doesn't require balance, just that the economy is growing faster than the debt, while the plan does put the debt to gdp ratio on a downward trajectory, it probably doesn't need to be quite as steep. ezra klein, this is a big deal, and you're here on this show to prove it is a big deal. you would never come out this late if this wasn't a huge deal. >> absolutely not. >> this is huge. the debt is the reason we have to do all these terrible things to medicare, which
congressman paul ryan a budget. >> this budget more than just balanced. >> can we reduce our deficit and debt and still help those who are neediest in america. can we have a safety net that survives and still reduce the deficit? paul ryan says no. >> at least budgets are passing around here for a change. the government's going to have to learn to do more with less, it's not the government's money, it's the people's money. >> the senate democrats are considering a number of balances ever-- >> and house committee chair paul ryan telling us republicans and democrats are still world's apart. well, that is an understatement. we saw that just an hour ago. the democratic-led senate defeating the ryan house budget 40-59. so is there any hope left? here is congressman paul ryan. >> great to see you. >> great it to see you again. >> greta: i want to talk about the budget that passed today, i imagine you're happy. >> we're very happy. we passed a balanced budget and it's important we owe the country a reasonable plan and grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a statistical exercise it's the
the deficit by meaning don't raise revenue are not serious about cutting the deficit. >> neil: even though we've raised revenue, bottom line. >> we should be willing to close tax loopholes if we didn't have a deficit, if we didn't have debt. it's the right thing to do. >> neil: we raised taxes. >> i didn't say raise taxes, i said close loopholes. republicans call closing loopholes raising taxes because it's the rich that have unfair practice. >> neil: have you filled out your brackets? yes or no. have you filled out your brackets? >> no, i haven't done that. i'm going to leave that to the president. he may be late on that too. >> neil: i'm sorry. thank you very much. >> thank you, neil. >> neil: do you remember this? an interview i said senator paul and senator cruz were whacko birds. that's inappropriate and i apologize to them for saying that. >> neil: after that, senator cruz accepted that apology. is senator rand paul about to do the same? and as nevada mourns the death of seven marines, did their senator blame the sequester? meet the military commander telling harry to say i'm sorry. [ m
of the simpson-bowles plan. the plan reduced the deficit through the balance approach that clued additional targets cuts and also revenue from closing a lot of the special interest tax breaks for very wealthy people, tax breaks which mitt romney and paul ryan talked been on the campaign trail. >> neil: they were without raising the overall rate. now we have the rates raised. so republicans talk of a need for a trigger. they might go along with this tax break stuff and all their closing the loopholes, that they did agree it's sort of wasting time and money and the tax code, but you guys have then got to, as part of the trigger, agree simultaneously to these cuts you talked about. what do you make of that? >> well, first of all, the difference is republicans have never said they're willing to close some of those tax loopholes for the purpose of reducing the deficit. which is what the bipartisan -- >> neil: i got a couple on you. i suspect no angel in the ranks of either party. but they did say that they would be open to closing these loopholes but without this being the only negotiating point
as this president's-- as this president tells us we don't have a deficit problem. >> greta: i don't get in. the pr, look, he's not going to sit down every night and do the budget himself, he outsources to his staff, but you've got the house and the senate had the same hurdles he did, whether it's a continuing resolution or sequestration, the same problems and they've now gotten their two budgets in and you think that he would crack the whip on his own staff and say, get this in so we can move forward. >> i have to tell you, greta, when i was the mayor of new york i did my budget. i spent hours, stayed up until, 3, 4, 5 in the morning at times going through the budget because i believed that i understand it as the chief executive. i had to understand the budget because the only way you really can make an impact on government is by understanding the budget. and for this president to be in office for five years, not be able to get a budget done on time, really tells us that he has no interest in our economy, he has no real interest in straightening out our budget problems. i don't know what his prior
taxes. i thought the increased taxes would maybe go to taking care of some of the deficit. no. it's simply going to continually expanding the size and scope of dot government, and those taxes are on families, just like obamacare is placing taxes on family. you do not hear the republican leadership saying we're the defenders of the american family, of businesses. we want to unleash this economy so that it will absolutely grow. by the way, about that easter egg hunt. why, if they're going to haste do they even put it on the tickets they were threatening to stall the whole thing? that would be the first time in the history of the easter egg roll that it would have been cancelled for politics. the only other time it's been cancelled, it's for war. it's a stunning thing but all too justify this administration's temper tantrum over wanting to have a complete free rein to spend as much as they want. >> neil: eggs actually. they don't know. i'm done. i'm done. thank you very much. this will be our lead issue tonight. why this guy who did this dance is really wigging out right now. david w
dollar deficits, no growth, which is true, and we keep having these states with higher taxes and destroying output, it could happen here. it terrifies me. >> what would trigger it would be sharply higher interest rates when people -- in order to buy our debt. not talking about just a few points here but dramatically higher interest rates where it's impossible for us to pay our entire debt load. then becomes a point where we reach financial collapse. >> neil: when people don't trust their financial institution. but when it's your bank bank, your passbook savings account, that is called into question, that galvanizes. then what? >> here's the thing, neil. that almost happened in the past and i think hank paulsen and bernanke and the leadership -- recappallizing the banks was the way to go. in these countries, the banking system is the government. they're so intertwined. we're not there but we're getting there. and remember, once the government -- once they're questions about the sovereign -- sanctity of the dollar, everything falls because our banking system is aligned with our
to cut the democrbudg deficits and cut defense spending and simplify the tax code and lower tax rates. in a deal with president obama they could get the first four, more deficit reduction, protect defense, the democratic president would get some cover in cutting medicare and social security and they could simplify the tax code by taking out expenditures. they are now saying they want none of those things and also not going to get the tax rates and keep the sequester and not have a deal. i've asked a lot of them to walk me through the reasoning here and honestly never come to an answer i understand a little bit. >> does that mean they're post policy. even some things that seem like constants don't actually a matter them, it's pure politics, just positioning themselves v a vis-a-vis the president and not interested in a particular outcome for the country? >> i would like to have an answer where that isn't true. i really would. i've been trying to find it. i'm sure part is i'm not smart enough to do so or found the right people to have spoken to them. it's hard to come up with one. we c
the president a major deficit reduction victory or not? if they really believe that needs to be done and the president put something on the table that gets them significant entitlement reform and savings, i think they've got to do it. >> harold, i think the possibility of deals and immigration, possibility of deals on guns, possibility of deals on the budget, on the long-term debt, i think the possibilities are actually -- excuse me for being optimistic, pretty darn good on all fronts. you've got republicans who daily are holding press conferences wringing their hands trying to figure out how to save their party. and you have a president who, again, he's a 47%, pretty damn good considering everything. but still, he wants to be over 50% and he wants a legacy. he doesn't want to just talk about what he did the first two years. >> i agree. i believe the prospects for progress on both immigration and gun control are gun regulation. if we get progress on the budget and the debt. i think immigration and gun regulations are easier to win. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong,
of spending decisions that add up to massive debt and deficit. tonight, there is a week-long series on what to cut. >> government is not the solution to the problem. government the problem. >> rare of big government is over. >> every president called to streamline federal bureaucracy but none succeeded. >> government is largeer than it ever has been. the debt is growing at record rate. >> adjusted for inflation. government spending went up from $882 billion spent every year in 1980s to $1.48 trillion in the 1990s. $2.24 trillion a year and the first decade of the 21st century. mast ited that government will have spent almost as much in the first four years as a new decade as in the 1990s. >> in the past there bar crisis like world war ii or the korean war, nondefense spending was cut by 20 to 30%. >> that didn't happen after 9/11 or after the financial crisis. >> nothing typifies the expansion of government as much as the growing wealth of the washington, d.c. area. region with few neutral resources and little manufacturerring to produce well. the average government worker compensation is o
there? you can go and beat hair cut there. but they are running deficits of $350,000 a year. time to privatize? >> kimberly: time to supercuts. >> dana: speaking of that, we did a google search. if you let the senators know it would not be the end of the world if you had to give up the senate barbershop. look on the map. there are seven places in walking distance from the capitol to get your hair cut. >> kimberly: now give them coupons to go over there. and give it to the barber and start it up. c'mon, i pay less to get my hair done. >> dana: time to privatize the senate barbershop? >> greg: i don't know. look at the success the barbershops have had. good job, guys. >> eric: you got your hair cut? >> greg: they fell asleep at the wheel. i use the great acres analogy. obama's democrats are like the sexy zaza that could expense every vehicle they have. eddie arnold is the guy that always has to play the bills. we have zsa zsa gabor in the white house. it's great because in a sense they're our mother so they tell us thousand use the microwave. might be at night they give us a bedtime
that the obama care would be deficit-neutral and control costs i think has turned out to be a charade. if you look at the longer term projections it looks especially more unlikely today than it did when they were engaged in the budget that allowed it to pass. what i think is interesting on the political side is how republicans are treating the issue right now. there is a debate inside the republican party whether it's wise to continue talking about obamacare. on one hand you have a group that says in effect this is over, this is done, we should tweak it, try to improve it, do what we can. let's not focus op it because it's in the past and discussion of aweer thety. on the other hand people think talk about it all the time because implementation is proving difficult and it will be more difficult as we go along to the republicans' benefit. >> bret: the second group of republicans believe the thing could crater. it could just not work. >> correct. that is a possibility. i think that the comment we just heard, there are thousands of pages of regulation that people haven't read is true. i don't ca
if you don't tax device makers? it comes from the taxes. this is going to be added on the deficit. they constructed a budget, that made it look as if, as obama promised, not going to cost the treasury a dime. well, the cbo says it will cost $1.3 trillion over a decade. so there is an increase in $1.3 trillion plus a dime in taxes. so that it ends up looking like it's not going to cost. but there will be increases in taxes everywhere. this one will be canceled. it's ridiculous. this is the one area, medical devices where the u.s. has tremendous advantage in technology over the rest of the world. why would you kill an industry that is so productive? so, the money will be cut. it will have to come out of taxes. the $1.3 trillion will become $1.6 trillion. it will climb. ultimately it will be a drag on the economy. i think ultimately after it hits and you get a train wreck and all the inefficiencies people will say in a couple of years, why don't we adopt a canadian system? cut out the middleman. and stop all the waste. simply have a simple system. government is completely in control
billion deficit. they don't want to get to where stock toeupbs righ stockton is right now so they are under this emergency pherg, state control. a lot of people have scheduled a protest today, are being called for to protest this move. what exactly wha will he be responsible for? >> slicing and dicing. cutting salaries of city employees. detroit already has a high crime rate. you don't want what happened to stockton, just like matt said they have per capita more murders in the city of chicago. how is that possible, little stockton? if you look at the map in california everybody was moving out in san francisco, properties were too high there, same with palo at torques silicon valley, they moved to stockton. what could happen in detroit unless they start cutting more. if detroit has to file for chapter 9 bankruptcy municipal that would make headlines around the world and kind prus would be booted off the front page. >> that's what they are trying to do and -- >> the mayor and the city council loose all the authority they shr-fplt they've been trying and they can't do that. the
? >> sure, i do. one problem with the baseline is it brings the deficit later on of the we looked at the budget and realized we could probably balance in five years. the problem is with the way the numbers work is it brings you back out of balance soon thereafter. what we wanted to do is have a credible plan that got us to balancing, got us into surplus. that's what our budget does. there is something unique in the baseline where deficits go down to the mid part of the next ten years and then go right back up. what we want to do is get them on a downward path and keep them down. we not only balance the budget, we go into surpluses and pay off the debt. >> brian: here is chris van hollen. he seems to disagree with everything you say. here is an example. >> i'm used to that. >> let me focus first on what our budget focuses on, which is not just economic growth in jobs in the future, but jobs in economic growth now and in the future. this republican budget is not balanced in ten years. >> brian: is he right? is it not in balance? >> no, it does balance in ten years. they're throwing
, italy because they're all suffering and because of too much spending, too much debt, deficit is too high. all right, senator, congratulations on your big win. i know when you announce if you're running for president you'll do it hear? you want to make that promise? >> oh, yeah, we didn't already announce it. >> sean: no, i'm just checking. thank you, senator. >> all right. >> sean: appreciate it. and coming up on "hannity." >> i studied the constitution myself. i'm roonebly well-educated and i thank you for the lecture. >> i would note that she chose not to answer the question that i asked. >> the answer is obvious no. >> sean: well, she did need the lecture, left wing senator dianne feinstein says she felt, quote, patronized by that exchange simply because she was asked about the assault weapons ban. and ted cruz will join me to respond and later dr. benjamin carson brought down the house over at cpac and hinting that he may run for the white house. i'll ask him about that and much more. this is a jam-packed edition of "hannity." much more straight ahead. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer
. according to the weekly standard after running deficits 350,000 a year for years. the senate hair care center is going private. and according to the sergeant at arms who is responsible for trying out the new model, government subsidized haircuts shaves and shine will be a thing of the past and you the taxpayer will no longer foot the bill for the grooming of your senators. the american taxpayers have forked over 5.25 million dollars for, yes, senate hair care. pretty unbelievable, or maybe not. because we do know how important the perfect haircut is well, to certain senators. remember john edwards? remember this? ♪ i feel pretty, oh so pretty ♪ ♪ i feel pretty and witty and bright ♪ ♪ >> oh, what a classic. that's all the time we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled, the news continues. greta is next and see you back here tomorrow night. greta, take it away. >> greta: this is a fox news alert. an 8th marine has died after a mortar shell explosion during a training accident in nevada. several marines were also hurt in
deficits and debt. how can you not worry about that. they do seem integrally involved in phobia, a lot of we don't want anybody else coming to this country. >> yeah, yeah, that's -- that's true, chris. it's this idea that they're losing their country. they fear change. they fear -- they're anxious about the change that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be li
what's called video deficit when they watch the screen passively, they can't really assemble a coherent narrative about what's happening. the way our brains develop, we need some interaction, which a tablet actually supplies because you do something and you get a response for it. it's not a substitute for a loving care giver of some sort in your life, but at least it's responding. >> i do wonder, though, about attention spans. i have two kids, 6 and 10. i'm one of these brooklyn mommies that buys hand made wooden toys from germany andy courages the kids to read books. although when i need them to be quiet, i will hand them the kindle fire. and i do notice that they're a little more -- my son is a little more agitated after playing games on that. is there anything there to worry about really? >> let's start by saying your son's a boy. i'd say based on my experience -- and those who grew occupy without these devices is the same. it's true, all things in moderation, although as part of her expiration of the story, hannah kind of experimented on her own kid and let her youngest play as much
.6 trillion annual budget, he can manage a $16 trillion deficit, but somehow he can't figure out how to keep tours open for the american people? he can't even figure that out? how is he supposed to figure out all those other heady things bob is talking about the real serious decisions which he can't control that he does control which is the white house. bill: talk about the job loss. that eventually will come. bob, if you were working in the white house would you have closed off the tours? i mean is that the decision you would have reached for? >> i would have canceled toilet paper order first. the reality is, but, look, you know, when brad talks about this, there are now boats in newport news, virginia, in for retrofitting have been stopped, the work on them. there are airports that are in fact airports closed down, small ones around the country. there have been furloughs done at the border. there are a lot of things going on here that should not be looked at. bill: it will not look good if you have 35,000,000 members of congress and their family members on the south lawn -- >> i'm not argu
federal deficits in five years makes it imprudent to jump in with both feet. consider on tuesday paul endorsed a version of immigration reform that would allow the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants in this country to become legal. the week before he defied the hawks in his party to lead a 13-hour filibuster in protest of the obama admission's secretory over its drone war fare program. >> dan senor, you've been involved in republican presidential primaries lately. sorry about that. how would those issues stack up in new hampshire and iowa and south carolina and florida? >> i think the politics, his politics on pure fiscal issues will have tremendous resonance as his father experienced in some primary states and caucus states. i think what is untested is -- from a -- from a political standpoint is his position on foreign policy. his father never really broke through on the neoisolationist politics at the grassroots level beyond a narrow segment of the electorate. rand who i've spent time talking about these issues is much salvier than his father. >> his father blamed in effect u.
the rate. we say, let's take some of that revenue to help reduce the deficit, combined with other targeted cuts. >> be more specific for me. when you talk about tax loopholes and the very wealthy. which specific loopholes and what is very wealthy? >> sure, sure, these are, when you're in the highest tax bracket, you're in the 39% tax bracket when you get a deduction, whatever it may be for, you get 39 cents worth of deduction. whereas somebody who is in the 28% tax bracket only gets 28 cents deduction for that particular deduction. so what we're saying and this is similar to a proposal the president's put forward, is that for folks who are in that very high bracket, the 39% bracket, the value of your deductions will be limited to about 28% which is what the value of deductions is for a middle income taxpayer. >> so ultimately, the budget that you have there and i just read the little chunk of it, you have more revenue increases than cuts, right? >> within, within this particular budget, but if you look, soledad, at the two-year period of reduction we've been engaged in, which is -- include
to the president to prevent default. i have to tell you, wolf. we can't keep running up deficits like this. it will damage our economy deeply and people are saying that we don't have a crisis on the horizon. of course we do. we've got a debt that is on a tear right now. if the debt takes off like it's projected to do, it's not only hurting our economy today but destroying it for the next generation. we just can't sit around and be complicit with that. that means we have to do something about it. >> let me get your thoughts on a couple sensitive issues coming before congress. immigration reform. do you support a pathway to citizenship for the 11 or 12 million illegal immigrants in the united states? >> well, i think we can get the comprehensive immigration reform. i support reform. i supported the bush reforms in 2005 and 2006. i think we can find a way of making sure that people here with an undocumented status have an ability to adjust that status. we're not going to be able to deport 12 million people. and there is a way to do this without rewarding them for breaking the line or breaking
, thankfully. >>> facing a $1 billion deficit, chicago public school system is making some really big changes. ceo barbara byrd bennett says the district's underutilized skols will be closed. they have not said how many schools are expected to close but opponents say they unfairly target minorities. >>> 24 and counting for the miami heat. but it was not easy. it hasn't been easy the last few games. lebron james and company came back from 27 points down in the third. >> can you believe that? >> beat his old team, the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. a triple-double. 12 boards, 10 assists. the heat are now within nine games of the nba record for consecutive wins held by the '71-'72 los angeles lakers. >> do you think they'll do it? >> no. they almost blew it against the celtics, almost blew it against the cavs. they are the best team i've seen in years. i don't think they should ever lose necessarily but that's a lot of games to win in a row. >> i can't believe they were down that much and came back. >> i can't believe you can do that every night. >> i think they're doing it on purpose. >>> recovered
in the leadership, which is the deficit of trust between the two sides. but pulling back, they picture, wolf, many israeli critics of the president have said too often he lectures israelis and doesn't seem to understand israel. tonight those critics, man of them, are saying he now feels he has conveyed that he does understand israel in a deep personal way, wolf. >> jessica yellin traveling with the president in jerusalem getting ready to head over to jordan with him tomorrow. jessica, thanks. >>> we're getting new information about claims that syria has used chemical weapons. our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, has the very early results of the u.s. investigation. what is this, barbara? what are we hearing? >> brianna, as you said, the u.s. intelligence community has been working on this problem around the clock. did the syrian regime use chemical weapons. we do now have some initial results of that investigation. with video of syrians suffering from convulsions and breathing problems, and accusations of chemical weapons attacks, u.s. intelligence agencies have scrambled to determine if the
, nor sleet senator snow nor deficit. no word this morning, saturday mail delivery is back on. >>> and 911 shocker. >> can you tell can you tell me by tapping on the phone once that do not open the door. >> 911, where is your image? >> the frightening moments and amazing end. live on the cnn newsroom. >>> good morning, thank you for joining us. i'm carol costello. three people dead at the marine base in quantico. the base is in lockdown, law enforcement surrounded the building. >> the shooter, an active duty marine, was pronounced dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound by law enforcement at the scene. two other victims, a male and female, both active duty marines, were pronounced dead at the scene. the three marines involved in this incident, all permanent personnel assigned to officer candidate school. all of the candidates in the school are accounted for and safe. >> the base is used mostly for training and it's known as crossroads of the marine corps. we will have a live report at the bottom hour. >>> also following a truly horrifying story from georgia's southern
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28